All Things Fiction

I am so excited to be a stop on the blog tour for THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS by Tae Keller. From the moment I first read this book’s description I couldn’t wait to meet Natalie and find out whether scientific method helped her with everything she was going through with her family.

For my stop today I’m sharing my thoughts about this lovely and amazing book, which released last seek. So if you’d like to know what I though scroll down for my review.

If you haven’t yet heard about THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS or its author, Tae Keller, information about both book and author are below along with places to find them online.


About THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS

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Title: THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS
Author: Tae Keller
Release date: March 6, 2018
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Pages: 304
Formats: Hardcover, eBook

Description…

How do you grow a miracle? For the record, this is not the question Mr. Neely is looking for when he says everyone in class must answer an important question using the scientific method. But Natalie’s botanist mother is suffering from depression, so this is The Question that’s important to Natalie. When Mr. Neely suggests that she enter an egg drop competition, Natalie has hope.

Eggs are breakable. Hope is not. Natalie has a secret plan for the prize money. She’s going to fly her mother to see the Cobalt Blue Orchids—flowers that survive against impossible odds. The magical flowers are sure to inspire her mother to love life again. Because when parents are breakable, it’s up to kids to save them, right?

An extraordinary debut about the coming-of-age moment when kids realize that parents are people, too, and that talking about problems is like taking a plant out of a dark cupboard and giving it light. The Fourteenth Goldfish meets The Thing About Jellyfish in THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS.

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NOTE: This review is based on an ARC received from the publisher in exchange for my honest thoughts about the book. A Kindle eCopy was purchased for my collection.


The Review

THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS is a charming and delightful, emotional, meaningful, and thoroughly engaging read. It is full of hope and heartache and humor, clever footnotes, adorable illustrations, and a plethora of broken eggs.

Ever since Natalie’s mom all but disappeared from her life, Natalie’s been looking for answers and for a way to fix things so that the mom she knew will return and replace the not-there version who spends most of her days in bed.

Her new, overly enthusiastic science teacher’s suggestion that she participate in the local egg drop competition might not be such a bad one. It will give her just the opportunity she needs to help – that is, if she can win.

Going it alone she doesn’t stand a chance, but with her best friend Twig and new friend Dari on her team, winning is a real possibility – even with drop ideas that contain glitter, marshmallows, and chocolate.

Tae Keller created a sympathetic, relatable, likable, funny, flawed, and real character in Natalie. She put her character in a situation that forced her to grow up, to learn things she might not have wanted to learn, to adapt, to become more aware, more thoughtful, more understanding. But she didn’t make her go it alone.

The author did an incredible job of keeping her story at just the right amounts of serious and fun. It is moving and heart-rending. But with a hashtag happy teacher, a friend who doesn’t know the meaning of a whisper, and a dad whose idea of fun is running errands, it is equally as lighthearted and hilarious as it is affecting.

Aimed at a middle grade audience, THE SCIENCE OF BREAKABLE THINGS can be just as easily enjoyed by a young adult readership, as well as readers of most ages. It incorporates science in a way that is amusing and educational. It tackles emotionally tough issues. It introduces a bit of cultural diversity. It offers food for thought. It has some sweet and wonderful characters. And it is witty and smart and an amazingly great read.

The Rating


About Tae Keller

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TAE KELLER (@TaeKeller) grew up in Honolulu, Hawaii, where she wrote stories, ate spam musubis, and participated in her school’s egg drop competition. (She did not win.) After graduating from Bryn Mawr College, she moved to New York City to work in publishing, and now has a very stubborn Yorkie and a multitude of books as roommates. Visit her at TaeKeller.com and be sure to join her newsletter bit.ly/taekellernews.

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